Early 1850s Houses

 
56 Front Street (c. 1850)  Built originally as a log cabin, prior to the town plan of 1851, Southampton’s oldest building was the home of Angelique Longe (1844-1944), remembered as a Metis midwife who knew and used native plants for medicinal purposes and spoke four languages. The house continues to be owned by members of the Longe family.

56 Front Street (c. 1850)

Built originally as a log cabin, prior to the town plan of 1851, Southampton’s oldest building was the home of Angelique Longe (1844-1944), remembered as a Metis midwife who knew and used native plants for medicinal purposes and spoke four languages. The house continues to be owned by members of the Longe family.

71 Huron St N (1851)  Built in 1851 for the Crown Land Agent, Alexander McNabb, this Georgian style house originated as a 16 X 18 foot log building. The Georgian features of the house include its symmetrical façade and 6-over-6 windows. Alexander McNabb, his wife, and 4 children, lived in the house where McNabb also conducted business beginning in 1852, selling land lots through a rear window.

71 Huron St N (1851)

Built in 1851 for the Crown Land Agent, Alexander McNabb, this Georgian style house originated as a 16 X 18 foot log building. The Georgian features of the house include its symmetrical façade and 6-over-6 windows. Alexander McNabb, his wife, and 4 children, lived in the house where McNabb also conducted business beginning in 1852, selling land lots through a rear window.

18 Huron Street N (circa early 1850s)  After arriving in Southampton in 1848 and living in a log cabin at the mouth of the Saugeen River for 2 years, Southampton’s first permanent immigrant settler from Scotland, Captain John Spence, built this one-and-one-half storey Regency cottage, which is remarkable for retaining so many of its original architectural features. The original exterior features rough-cast siding over hand-split lathe and clapboards, six-over-six sash windows, a front door with sidelights and transom window, a hip roof and wide verandah. The original interior has a centre hall plan and the original pine floors, doors, wainscoting, stairs, and mouldings. In 1998 this important heritage house was provincially designated.

18 Huron Street N (circa early 1850s)

After arriving in Southampton in 1848 and living in a log cabin at the mouth of the Saugeen River for 2 years, Southampton’s first permanent immigrant settler from Scotland, Captain John Spence, built this one-and-one-half storey Regency cottage, which is remarkable for retaining so many of its original architectural features. The original exterior features rough-cast siding over hand-split lathe and clapboards, six-over-six sash windows, a front door with sidelights and transom window, a hip roof and wide verandah. The original interior has a centre hall plan and the original pine floors, doors, wainscoting, stairs, and mouldings. In 1998 this important heritage house was provincially designated.

221 Clarendon St. (1854)  Known as the “Three Sisters” this house was built by James D. Cathey (1817-?), a teacher at the Methodist Mission, Saugeen village from 1845 through 1849. He later moved to 221 Clarendon with his wife Agnes and children. Saugeen Township council first met in this house, in January 1854. From 1884 to 1909 this was home to Donald MacAulay (1834-1909), from the Isle of Lewis, fisherman and keeper of the two river Range Lights. The two-storey clapboard house featuring a half salt-box profile, a portico over the front door, and 6-over-six windows, is one of the few remaining of post-and-beam construction. In 1990 the owners, digging a backyard garden, uncovered a tombstone, "to the memory of Mary, daughter of George and Eustacia Cathey, died August 1856, age 19 years 5 mos" (possibly James Cathey's sister). The owners stopped work and reburied the stone. This house was designated as a Heritage Property under the Ontario Heritage Act.

221 Clarendon St. (1854)

Known as the “Three Sisters” this house was built by James D. Cathey (1817-?), a teacher at the Methodist Mission, Saugeen village from 1845 through 1849. He later moved to 221 Clarendon with his wife Agnes and children. Saugeen Township council first met in this house, in January 1854. From 1884 to 1909 this was home to Donald MacAulay (1834-1909), from the Isle of Lewis, fisherman and keeper of the two river Range Lights. The two-storey clapboard house featuring a half salt-box profile, a portico over the front door, and 6-over-six windows, is one of the few remaining of post-and-beam construction. In 1990 the owners, digging a backyard garden, uncovered a tombstone, "to the memory of Mary, daughter of George and Eustacia Cathey, died August 1856, age 19 years 5 mos" (possibly James Cathey's sister). The owners stopped work and reburied the stone. This house was designated as a Heritage Property under the Ontario Heritage Act.